All the World’s a Stage by William Shakespeare

All the World’s a Stage
by William Shakespeare
All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
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Word of the Day Wednesday: bellicose

bel·li·cose adjective \ˈbe-li-ˌkōs\: having or showing a tendency to argue or fight

 Full Definition of BELLICOSE
:  favoring or inclined to start quarrels or wars
bel·li·cos·i·ty noun

Examples of BELLICOSE

  1. <bellicose hockey players who always seem to spend more time fighting than playing>
  2. Never in peacetime, perhaps, have the statements of our government officials been more relentlessly bellicose. Yet their actions have been comparatively cautious. —New Yorker, 24 June 1985

Origin of BELLICOSE

Middle English, from Latin bellicosus, from bellicus of war, from bellum war

First Known Use: 15th century

Related to BELLICOSE

Synonyms
aggressive, agonistic, argumentative, assaultive, belligerent, brawly, chippy, combative, confrontational, contentious, discordant, disputatious, feisty, gladiatorial, militant, pugnacious, quarrelsome, scrappy, truculent, warlike
Antonyms
nonaggressive, nonbelligerent, pacific, peaceable, peaceful, unbelligerent, uncombative, uncontentious

Definition source: http://www.merriam-webster.com

The Word of the Day started with this post.

 

O Captain! My Captain! by Walt Whitman

O Captain! My Captain! by Walt Whitman
O CAPTAIN! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up-for you the flag is flung-for you the bugle trills;
For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths-for you the shores a-crowding;
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
Here Captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head;
It is some dream that on the deck,
You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;
Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

Word of the Day Wednesday: impetuous

im·pet·u·ous

adjective \im-ˈpech-wəs; –ˈpe-chə-, -chü-əs\

: acting or done quickly and without thought : controlled by emotion rather than thought

1:  marked by impulsive vehemence or passion <an impetuous temperament>
2:  marked by force and violence of movement or action <an impetuous wind>
im·pet·u·ous·ly adverb
im·pet·u·ous·ness noun


Definition source: http://www.merriam-webster.com

The Word of the Day started with this post.

 

Dream Deferred by Langston Hughes

Dream Deferred
by Langston Hughes
What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up
Like a raisin in the sun?

Or fester like a sore–
And then run?

Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over–
like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?

Word of the Day Wednesday: egregious

egre·gious adjective \i-ˈgrē-jəs\: very bad and easily noticed.

1 archaic :  distinguished
2:  conspicuous; especially :  conspicuously bad :  flagrant <egregious errors> <egregious padding of the evidence>
egre·gious·ly adverb
egre·gious·ness noun
 

Synonyms
blatant, conspicuous, flagrant, glaring, gross, obvious, patent, pronounced, rank, striking

Definition source: http://www.merriam-webster.com

 

There Is Another Sky by Emily Dickinson

There is Another Sky
by Emily Dickinson
There is another sky,
Ever serene and fair,
And there is another sunshine,
Though it be darkness there;
Never mind faded forests, Austin,
Never mind silent fields –
Here is a little forest,
Whose leaf is ever green;
Here is a brighter garden,
Where not a frost has been;
In its unfading flowers
I hear the bright bee hum:
Prithee, my brother,
Into my garden come!

"All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us." ~ J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

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