Word of the Day: logophile

log·o·phile noun ˈlôgəˌfīl,ˈlägə-/: a lover of words.

Here is what I found when I opened my fortune cookie from a recent lunch.  Oh, and there’s my lucky number: 13. 🙂

fortune

I’ll have to tell my daughter the synonym for this word and see if she remembers it when we get to “p.”

Definition source: www.thefreedictionary.com

The Word of the Day started with this post.

Musical Monday: Gone, Gone, Gone by Phillip Phillips

Here is another favorite by Phillip Phillips:

Gone, Gone, Gone

When life leaves you high and dry
I’ll be at your door tonight
If you need help, if you need help.
I’ll shut down the city lights,
I’ll lie, cheat, I’ll beg and bribe
To make you well, to make you well.
When enemies are at your door
I’ll carry you away from war
If you need help, if you need help.
Your hope dangling by a string
I’ll share in your suffering
To make you well, to make you well.
Give me reasons to believe
That you would do the same for me.
And I would do it for you, for you.
Baby, I’m not moving on
I love you long after you’re gone.
For you, for you.
You will never sleep alone.
I love you long after you’re gone
And long after you’re gone, gone, gone.
When you fall like a statue
I’m gon’ be there to catch you
Put you on your feet, you on your feet.
And if your well is empty
Not a thing will prevent me.
Tell me what you need, what do you need?
I surrender honestly.
You’ve always done the same for me.
So I would do it for you, for you.
Baby, I’m not moving on,
I love you long after you’re gone.
For you, for you.
You will never sleep alone.
I love you long after you’re gone
And long after you’re gone, gone, gone.
You’re my back bone.
You’re my cornerstone.
You’re my crutch when my legs stop moving.
You’re my head start.
You’re my rugged heart.
You’re the poultice that I’ve always needed.
Like a drum, baby, don’t stop beating.
Like a drum, baby, don’t stop beating.
Like a drum, baby, don’t stop beating.
Like a drum my heart never stops beating…
For you, for you.
Baby, I’m not moving on.
I love you long after you’re gone.
For you, for you.
You will never sleep alone.
I love you long after you’re gone.
For you, for you.
Baby, I’m not moving on,
I love you long after you’re gone.
For you, for you.
You will never sleep alone.
I love you long, long after you’re gone.
Like a drum, baby, don’t stop beating.
Like a drum, baby, don’t stop beating.
Like a drum, baby, don’t stop beating.
Like a drum my heart never stops beating for you.
And long after you’re gone, gone, gone.
I love you long after you’re gone, gone, gone.

Word of the Day: knickerbocker

photo from wikipedia
photo from wikipedia

Knick·er·bock·er noun (nkr-bkr): 1. a. A descendant of the Dutch settlers of New York. b. A native or inhabitant of New York [also known as Charles Yallowitz on WordPress]. 2. knickerbockers: Full breeches gathered and banded just below the knee; knickers.

Yesterday’s Word of the Day was jabberwocky. After telling my daughter the meaning of the word, we began to read Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll. When we came to the end of the chapter, I began to read words that were completely nonsensical, and she giggled. The she realized it was written in jabberwocky, the word she had just learned.

Here is the Jabberwocky poem:

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

photo credit: coverbrowser.com
photo credit: coverbrowser.com
      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
      And the mome raths outgrabe.
“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
      The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
      The frumious Bandersnatch!”
He took his vorpal sword in hand;
      Long time the manxome foe he sought—
So rested he by the Tumtum tree
      And stood awhile in thought.
And, as in uffish thought he stood,
      The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
      And burbled as it came!
One, two! One, two! And through and through
      The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
      He went galumphing back.
“And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
      Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”
      He chortled in his joy.
’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
      And the mome raths outgrabe.

The Word of the Day started with this post.

Definitions from http://www.merriam-webster.com

Word of the Day: jabberwocky

jab·ber·wocky noun \ˈja-bər-ˌwä-kē\:  meaningless speech or writing.

Here’s a scene from A Christmas Story where the father speaks in jabberwocky/profanities. It makes me laugh every time.

The Word of the Day started with this post.

Definitions from http://www.merriam-webster.com

 

Quote of the Week: J.R.R. Tolkien

Cover of "The Fellowship of the Ring (The...
Cover via Amazon

“The Road goes ever on and on Down from the door where it began.

Now far ahead the Road has gone,

And I must follow, if I can,

Pursuing it with eager feet,

Until it joins some larger way

Where many paths and errands meet.

And whither then? I cannot say”

~    J.R.R. Tolkien,    The Fellowship of the Ring

 

Word of the Day: illustrious

My daughter is still enjoying the Word of the Day game. I think her favorite word so far is gesticulate. Last night, she was telling her Daddy the meaning and spelling of the words she has learned. When she got to gesticulate, she started gesticulating wildly and said, “It’s like, you know, you move your hands around like crazy when you’re excited about something. It’s like what I’m doing right now.” Then she giggled.

It’s funny though. She remembers the definition of all the words, but diaphanous is not that clear to her. 🙂

il·lus·tri·ous adjective \i-ˈləs-trē-əs\: admired and respected very much because a lot was achieved. 1 notably or brilliantly outstanding because of dignity or achievements or actions :  eminent. 2 archaic a:  shining brightly with light. b:  clearly evident.

“The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled.”
―    Plutarch

The Word of the Day started with this.

Definitions from www.merriam-webster.com

A Tale about The Canterbury Tales

Geoffrey Chaucer, whose Canterbury Tales share...
Geoffrey Chaucer, whose Canterbury Tales shares many sources with various Decameron tales, including IX, 6. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Read poetry every day of your life. Poetry is good because it flexes muscles you don’t use often enough. Poetry expands the senses and keeps them in prime condition. It keeps you aware of your nose, your eye, your ear, your tongue, your hand. And, above all, poetry is compacted metaphor or simile.” ~ Ray Bradbury on Feeding the Muse

One night when my husband and I were dating, we were discussing the books we read during high school. To my surprise, he admitted that he enjoyed reading The Canterbury Tales. He had to memorize the first 18 lines of the General Prologue and loved reciting the Middle English version it was written in. I asked him if he could remember the lines and he began to recite the following:

Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote
The droghte of Marche hath perced to the roote,
And bathed every veyne in swich licour,
Of which vertu engendred is the flour;
Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth
Inspired hath in every holt and heath
The tender croppes, and the younge sonne
Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne,
And smale fowles maken melodye,
That slepen al the night with open ye,
(So priketh hem nature in hir corages),
Than longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,
And palmer for to seken straunge strondes,
To ferne halwes, couthe in sondry londes;
And specially, from every shires ende
Of Engelond, to Canterbury they wende,
The holy blissful martir for to seke,
That hem hath helpen, whan that they were seke.
 

He was trying to be funny, and couldn’t  remember it in its entirety, but when he was finished, I sat there speechless. Then I said, “Would you mind doing that again?”

Here’s a version I found on YouTube, but my husband recites it better. 🙂

Here’s the Modern English version:

When in April the sweet showers fall
And pierce the drought of March to the root, and all
The veins are bathed in liquor of such power
As brings about the engendering of the flower,
When also Zephyrus with his sweet breath
Exhales an air in every grove and heath
Upon the tender shoots, and the young sun
His half-course in the sign of the Ram has run,
And the small fowl are making melody
That sleep away the night with open eye
(So nature pricks them and their heart engages)
Then people long to go on pilgrimages
And palmers long to seek the stranger strands
Of far-off saints, hallowed in sundry lands,
And specially, from every shire’s end
Of England, down to Canterbury they wend
To seek the holy blissful martyr, quick
To give his help to them when they were sick.

 

Book Review: Fearless by Devon Hartford

FearlessFearless (The Story of Samantha Smith #1) by Devon Hartford

Book Description (from Amazon): FEARLESS is the first in a series of full length novels. At the age of sixteen, Samantha Smith’s innocence was shattered in the blink of an eye. She kept the pain to herself for three years, burying her terrible secret beneath black clothes and black makeup, afraid to tell anyone. The price for her silence was the loss of her happiness and all of her friends. After moving from stuffy Washington D.C. to laid back San Diego, where Samantha is now a freshman at San Diego University, she is determined to find new friends and reclaim her optimistic spirit. Having thrown away her goth exterior, she hopes that her new sunny look will heal her wounds.  Dreaming of adventure, she wishes to escape the humdrum middle-class existence that has repressed her fiery nature for as long as she can remember. But her parents are pressuring her to major in Accounting because it’s the safe thing to do. Samantha secretly considers ditching the business major to study Art, a choice that would horrify her parents if they ever found out. When Samantha crosses paths with a troubled, handsome, tattoo-clad bad boy, her life spins into overdrive, and Samantha finds herself with more adventure than she ever dreamed possible.

My Review: What attracted me to this book? Uh, did you see the hot guy on the cover? {Take heed new authors: the cover is one of the most significant ways to get noticed} That got my attention, but that’s not what had me intrigued. It was the main character, Samantha Smith.

After reading the book description, I immediately related to her. No, I never went through a goth phase, but I was that girl who majored in Accounting because it was the safe thing to do. I also took Art classes because I loved it. I’m a creative being. I even switched my major to Art for a semester, but the doubts crept in. I was certain I would end up being a starving artist, so I switched back to the safe and boring world of Accounting.

Unlike the main character, my parents never forced me into that decision, at least not directly. They were both artistic people. I remember being amazed when my father drew a picture of Buddy, our pet owl. I didn’t even know he could draw, and his rendering resembled a photograph.

My parents unintentionally sent the message that art was something you did “on the side,” by choosing other careers. So I stayed with Accounting and did that for the next twenty years. But what if I had chosen another path? Would my life have been similar to that of Samantha Smith?

I was curious enough to read the book and find out. Like Samantha, I took Life Drawing and the model that posed nude in our class bore no resemblance to the “tattoo-clad bad boy” on the cover. In fact, the model wasn’t even male. Here’s a drawing I did of her from one of those classes:

LifeDrawingIf the handsome bad-boy had made an appearance, maybe I would’ve stuck with it. 🙂

All this to say Devon Hartford described a character I could relate to. I understood that yearning, the desire to be true to myself. That is what initially had me reading the story, but that’s where the similarities ended.

There were times when I couldn’t understand Samantha’s actions. I wanted to grab her by the shoulders and shake her. The bad boy was such a narcissistic, male chauvinist pig that I was sure he had chosen the name Adonis himself. He really turned me off at first, and I couldn’t understand why Samantha was still attracted to him. A handsome face and nice body can only get you so far. There were times when the character’s actions just didn’t seem to fit.

But, as the story progressed, more was revealed about them. A person isn’t always what they appear to be on the surface. A tortured past wreaks havoc on the human psyche. Thankfully, Adonis became known as Christos, a name and character that was more palatable to me (that’s what’s known as character arc). I was intrigued enough to keep reading, and enjoyed the story overall.

4 out of 5 stars

Word of the Day: gesticulate

She remembered!

When I told my daughter the Word of the Day yesterday (fickle), she said, “Oh! Oh! It’s like that other word, ca-capricious! It means you’re moody. You change your mind a lot.”

I’m so happy she’s learning something from this little game we started! Here is today’s Word of the Day:

ges·tic·u·late intransitive verb \je-ˈsti-kyə-ˌlāt\: to move your arms and hands especially when speaking in an angry or emotional way.

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” ~ Nelson Mandela

The Word of the Day started with this.